Preparing for the Bishop’s visit, Holy Week and Easter

Candles, wafers, wine, palm crosses, (note ‘Ricky’ on the side of the box ūüôā ), & altar linen ¬© Ricky Yates

There is a month with five Sundays to go, before I retire. But within that short period, I have a visit from my Anglican Diocesan Bishop, Rt Rev’d Dr Robert Innes, followed by Palm Sunday, Holy Week and Easter, then two weeks later, my farewell service.

Following worship last Sunday, I realised that there were several things that needed attention. The first was, that unless we were to expect Bishop Robert to perform the miracle of Cana ūüôā , we needed more wine for communion. Whilst not quite as desperate, we were also running quite low on communion wafers.

Secondly, both altar candles had burnt quite low and one had sprayed wax . . . → Read More: Preparing for the Bishop’s visit, Holy Week and Easter

The new house in Star√° OleŇ°ka

The new house © Ricky Yates

 

As I’ve explained in my two previous blog posts, here and here, and in responding to comments on them, I’ve been looking to buy a house into which to retire, in the vicinity of the north Bohemian town of Dec√≠n. This is the promised update.

On Thursday 9th March, I went to view this house, along with Martin Tonder of Vesta Realitn√≠. Having overnight pondered on what I saw, the next day, I sent off an email with an offer to buy. By the morning of Tuesday 14th March, my offer had been accepted ūüôā

After a few days delay, I’ve now received translations into English of two documents for me and the current owners . . . → Read More: The new house in Star√° OleŇ°ka

Decín

Dec√≠n on the Labe river with the Z√°mek/Ch√Ęteau on the right ¬© Ricky Yates

Dec√≠n is a town that lies either side of the Labe (Czech), Elbe (German), river. It is situated at the beginning of a deep gorge where the Labe cuts through the Elbe Sandstone Mountains, Labsk√© p√≠skovce (Czech), Elbsandsteingebirge (German), on its way to Dresden in Germany and eventually flowing into the North Sea beyond Hamburg. The area to the east of the Labe is known as Bohemian Switzerland, Cesk√© ҆v√Ĺcarsko (Czech), B√∂hmische Schweiz (German), about which I’ve written previously here on my blog.

Dec√≠n is 130km north-west of Prague and takes around one-and-a-half hours to reach by either road or rail. But its closeness to the German border means that it only takes forty-five minutes by train to get to Dresden. Therefore . . . → Read More: Dec√≠n

From Winter into Spring

After a very cold and snowy winter, as I explained in my eighth blog anniversary post, in the last couple of weeks, Winter has slowly begun to recede and Spring is arriving. Therefore, it is certainly time to get my blog out of hibernation, being very aware that I haven’t posted anything here for a month.

There are numerous events that I could write about but here are just three highlights from the last couple of weeks.

My birthday burger © Ricky Yates

Birthday

On Sunday 26th February, I celebrated my sixty-fifth birthday. This is the second time since moving to Prague, that my birthday has fallen on a Sunday. The last time was on the occasion of my sixtieth birthday in 2012 which was also a leap . . . → Read More: From Winter into Spring

Why adding the letter ‘y’ is so funny

Hot dogy anyone? ūüôā ¬© Ricky Yates

Right from the beginning of my time spent living and working in the Czech Republic, one of the things that has constantly amused me, is seeing an English word on a shop, an advertising hoarding, or in a menu, with the letter ‘y’ added to the end of the word. For example – a sports shop advertising that it sells ‘Snowboardy’ and ‘Skateboardy’.

There is a simple explanation as to why this occurs ‚Äď adding the letter ‘y’ to the end of a noun, is the most common way in Czech, to make a word plural. It is the virtual equivalent of adding the letter ‘s’ in English, so that ‘snowboard’, becomes ‘snowboards’.

However, very few of even the most fluent English-speaking Czechs, understand why ‘snowboardy’ and ‘skateboardy’ . . . → Read More: Why adding the letter ‘y’ is so funny